Busy?  Then you probably shouldn’t be doing any…

Busy? Then you probably shouldn’t be doing any…

I think there are three classifications of working out that correspond to different parts of the year/your schedule – training, working out and exercise.  If your super busy, then you probably shouldn’t be doing any training.
Training is goal focused, time committed, DRIV-ICATION!
Let me explain further.  I have a lot going on right now – Jamie and I are getting married IN EXACTLY ONE MONTH!!!  Holy shit balls.  Plus, it’s been about 6 months since my last chemo round AND I am getting back into the gym full time.  From January of last year to March of this year I lost over 10 pounds of muscle.  That sucked.  I worked hard to gain that mass and it was heartbreaking to see my body whither away from the chemo.
Side Note – The weight didn’t didn’t wither away that much, but rather I lost muscle and gained a substantial amount of fat.  Cachexia be damned!  Cachexia is muscle wasting/weight loss associated with chemo.  Well, I lost the muscle but gained some fat thanks to my little friend (maybe I will talk more about him later 😉
fitness training

It was tough going from this…

To this.

After chemo, I was READY to start TRAINING.  But first, I had to build my body back up, so I started with EXERCISING before moving into WORKING OUT, then I TRAINED to get my lean body mass back.
Which incidentally was ALMOST a success, I gained about 7 pounds of the 10 I lost.  The other 3 pounds will come back eventually, but not right now.

I will get my guns back.

The exercising consisted of walking and biking with some light resistance training and yoga.  Truth be told, I was just happy to be able to get out of the house without throwing up.  That lasted for roughly 3 months, from September to December.  In December and January, I started to work out.  I pushed it harder, incorporated more resistance training and more interval training.  In February I started TRAINING.

I was so happy to finally be able to just WALK with out getting winded.

From November to May my goal was to get back down to under 15% body fat (from over 20%), get my lean body mass back up to 150 pounds (from 140) AND work on getting my strength back (interestingly my strength came back much faster in my upper body than my lower body).  PLUS I wanted to start my new life.  They say that after you go through cancer treatment you are never the same.
I can say I agree with that 100%.  The old Ben is gone, he was burned off with the cancer cells.  The new Ben is still trying to figure out where he fits in all of this.  But god damn it if he doesn’t have close to his old body back!
As of April 14th – I hit almost all of those goals.  Now I could still lean out a little bit more before the wedding, however, I am choosing to drop back to just working out and moving away from training for the next month.  And, I am still trying to figure out who the new me is, but it’s coming along.
Here’s why – I am busy.  Busy with planning the wedding.  Busy with working more.  Busy with getting my life back.
This time last year I was losing my hair, starting my 2nd round of chemo and watching the world go by around me while I sat and played video games, watched Netflix (it might sound like fun, but going from a very driven and healthy state to not having enough energy to walk and talk wasn’t fun….and trust me on this fellas, while it may seem like your missing playing video games and vegging out, no one got healthy and/or successful by just doing that) and counted down the days until my next treatment.
When you wake up and have every day like that…watching the world around you change and evolve and your looking down at your fingernails bending back while you’re trying to open a can of club soda…it can be pretty depressing.
Let’s review the three stages of working out before we get deeper.  Understand that you should NEVER just “go to the gym” without a goal in mind.  Whether that goal is to improve your body composition, get stronger or just to stave off aging, there should always be a goal.
1.  Training –
You are 100% focused on your goal, nothing can get in your way.  You want to lose 10 pounds, or improve your deadlift, or do a tough mudder, etc.  This level requires time, commitment and probably a pretty hefty dose of improving/working on your diet. You are 100% focused on your goal, nothing can get in your way.  You want to lose 10 pounds, or improve your deadlift, or do a tough mudder, etc.  This level requires time, commitment and probably a pretty hefty dose of improving/working on your diet.
2. Working out –
You are focused on your goal…but maybe not committed to it.  While working out your goal is to keep at least 80% of the results you got up to this point, ideally 90%.
3.  Exercising –
You think about your goal, but realize that right now, it’s probably best just to go in, get a workout in to maintain your results and go home.
Training is meant to happen for 4-16 week blocks.  Why 4-16 weeks?  Because most people have a life.  Training takes 100% focus on yourself.  You have to get those workouts in, you have to (maybe) get those calories in or really focus on your diet.  Life needs to take a back seat because you are FOCUSED 100% on that goal related to your body.

Not the time to be training for anything…except to SURVIVE!

Working out is a step down from training.  Are you supposed to get 4 workouts in?  Maybe you get 3 this week plus an at home circuit.  Are you supposed to eat 4 meals or hit 2000 calories?  Maybe you were just too busy to really focus on eating.  During the working out stage, the diet tends to take the first hit as that’s the most time-consuming.
Exercising?  Well now, that’s party season.  If you are a dedicated gym goer, you probably won’t ever really get to this level and instead bounce around between working out and training.  Exercising is moving around with the goal of improving your baseline health.  Walking, swimming, jogging, cycling, some group fitness classes, etc.  Those are all examples of exercising.  The diet during exercising tends to be in the lines of “what diet?”.  Another way to think about exercising is what you do if you go on a week long vacation.  You enjoy your vacation life while still being active.  At least that’s what KDR members are told to do!
  • You need time to TRAIN.
  • You need less time to work out.
  • You need even less time to exercise.

What happens if you FORCE yourself to train during a time you should be working out?

 1. First – nothing bad.  That’s called driv-icated, or a mix of driven and dedicated…to yourself.  We can’t be driv-icated 100% of the time because we would have no friends, no life and no future outside of whatever we are focused on.
But, because training takes a lot out of you, you must pay that back.  If your goal is to really:
  • – Lose weight.
  • – Build muscle.
  • – Change your body.
You need to prioritize nutrition, sleep, and gym.  Not in that order, but pretty close.  If you’re in the gym 5 hours a week, plus prepping and food shopping for 3 hours per week and prioritizing your sleep (which means 8 hours per night minimum) AND working an 8-hour job…that’s a lot.  Probably don’t want to be doing that while you’re trying to stay cool organizing a wedding.  That’s time for working out.
2. Second – you will often times either get injured, spin your wheels without making progress, get frustrated at your results and at the worse…waste your time.
If you’re truly training for something then you need to recover WAY more then you need to train.  And recovery is essentially stress management and destress strategies.  Understand that the body identifies stress as anything that moves it out of homeostasis, from winning the lottery to being attacked by a bear…it’s all the same hormones and stress response by the body.  So if your fighting over table placement or working on lifting your personal best in the squat…you need to recover from that stress.
Bottom line for me (and probably some of you reading this) – I can’t continue to work out 3 days per week HARD in the gym for an hour, and do an hour of cardio per week, plus 90 minutes of yoga AND count my calories and get 8 hours of restful sleep…4 weeks before I get married and short staffed.
I need to go back to working out while still focusing on my diet and sleep.  But, the workouts need to be less than 45 minutes strength training (just like our small group workouts) AND about 20-30 minutes of interval training (just like our team training classes).  We’re so smart at KDR.
So – here’s my question for you.  Look at your schedule, do you honestly have AT LEAST 4 weeks to commit to a pursuing a goal and TRAINING.  4 weeks where nothing is coming up, no plans and you can commit to yourself 100%?  Maybe you have 8 weeks…then do our 8 week Eat to Lose challenge.
But if you don’t have 4 weeks, that’s ok, that doesn’t mean you stop going to the gym, that means you just work out and focus on keeping 80% of your progress.
fitness training
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Buttfessions A Kettlebell Fitness Coach: [PART 2]

Buttfessions A Kettlebell Fitness Coach: [PART 2]

On this weeks buttfessions lets talk about jeans for the petite athletic female. What do I mean by petite and athletic? Well, if your butt is bigger then your waist, you know what I am talking about.

It’s a bitch finding jeans that “fit”. Most clothing companies don’t make jeans to fit women with glutes or quad…or muscles for that matter. It’s a good problem to have BUT it’s still a problem. I don’t want to wear workout/yoga pants every day! Plus I really hate trying clothes on (Ben loves to shop…true story…you should see his shoe collection) so when I find a pair of jeans I stick with them.

Common issues I have are:
The waist gap – when they fit my quads and butt just right…but I have a big waist gap in the back.
The loose knees – when they fit perfect on the waist, butt and quads but my knees are baggy. What?!
The skinny jean – I find a size that fits perfectly on butt, waist, and quads…TOO long. I have to roll them up like 3 times!
The Saggy crotch – I barely squeeze them over my quads, get them buttoned…ok…suddenly they went from a high waist to a low waist because I can’t get them all the way up over my butt. The result is a saggy crotch that may split if I do the squat test. ALWAYS DO THE SQUAT TEST!

So what do I wear?

Hear what other fitness professionals are wearing!

http://www.motherfitness.com/the-fittest-booties-dish-out-fave-jeans-picks/

Last week I gave you my favorite (builder) glute exercises. Link from 1st post. Check them out here.

 

 

 

 

Here are my top 5 sculptures:

x-band walkouts

 

SL Hip Ups

Quad. hydrants

 

Side Lying ABD’s

These are movements you can do every day and add to your current workout program. I prefer a high rep range, 15-30 on each to maximize the burn AND pump. Love thy pump! I hope my buttfessions helps you embrace what you have and work with it rather than working against it.

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What Types of Protein Should I Eat In My Kettlebell Training?

What Types of Protein Should I Eat In My Kettlebell Training?

A member asked a unique question recently. This question is a great question for anyone in our gym utilizing Kettlebell Training on a regular basis. Here’s the question:

“I want to be more conscientious with my meat purchases in terms of where it comes from, which makes it cost more. I would like to try a meal a week being vegetarian, but am not really sure how to do that without losing out on protein – or resorting to tofu.”

Why?  Why do you want to be more conscientious of your meat purchases?  Generally, people choose to select “better” sources of food (i.e. non-GMO, organic, local, free-range, etc.) because they feel it will improve their health or have less of an impact on the environment.  I am not going to touch the environment thing, but ill comment on the health point.

Think of a fuel gauge, except at one end put unhealthy and at the other end put healthy.  Now let’s say you start at the unhealthy end and you want to move the needle as far toward health as possible.  Then, you need:

  1. Strength training.
  2. Adequate calories.
  3. Adequate nutrients.
  4. Cardiovascular training.
  5. Self-care – yoga, meditation, adequate SLEEP, etc.
  6. A happy outlook on life.

Hitting those 6 points is going to move you 75-80% towards the healthy side.  The other 10% is the cumulative effect of those things, and the other 10% is arguably genetics and environment.  Drink town water?  Probably not great for your overall health.  Smoke?  Seriously?  That certainly won’t move the needle towards health.  In fact, lifestyle is all of these heavy drinker, chronic workaholic, poor sleeper, etc.

Food choices outside of NOT eating a standard American diet composed of processed sugars and fats and watching your overall sugar intake….ANY food choices outside of those will move the needle towards health.

Eating organic, local, free-range, non-gmo blah blah blah won’t move the needle that much.  It just won’t.  Now…I had cancer…so maybe you don’t want to listen to me. However, I don’t think that was due to my lifestyle.

And you can certainly find information to prove me wrong.  But I can find info to prove you wrong.  At the end of the day, I put eating organic, free range, non-gmo, etc. in the realm of “religious belief.”  In other words, you do something because you THINK it makes a difference. However, you can’t conclusively prove that belief will make the difference you think it will.  Some people believe in God (or a higher being) because they want something after they die.  But, we can’t conclusively prove it…i.e. that there is an afterlife.  That’s a religious belief. Ok, onto the advice.

First – shop locally.

There are a HUGE number of local farms that supply chicken, pork, lamb, beef, bison and a whole bunch of other meat choices.  However – be prepared.  You’re going to pay upwards of at least $7 per pound (that’s only if you buy in bulk) and often $10 per pound.  PRICEY!

Second – you can lose weight and be healthy.

by eating a large combination of foods and following a very diverse number of diets.  No diet HAS to include meat, however, it just so happens that meat provides us with valuable nutrients that we can’t get from other sources, or we can’t get EASILY from other sources.  One meal vegetarian is ok as long as you get the minimum grams of protein you need – roughly 100 grams for females and 125 for males (those are assuming your working out, if not then it’s more like 40 grams and 60 grams.)

Third – Beans and nuts. 

Most vegetarian meals are inherently low calories.  While they are very nutritious in terms of nutrients, they are not very energy fueling.  You ever try and eat 3 cups EACH of broccoli, onions, peppers and mushrooms.  I have.  It’s hard.  And there is only about 500 calories in those 12 cups depending on what you cook them with.  So…beans and nuts.  You’re still going to eat a huge volume of food, however, by adding the beans and nuts into the meal you’re adding in protein as well as calories.

So a vegan meal would consist of – at least 4-8 cups of different veggies of varying texture – onions, mushrooms, peppers, and broccoli, with probably 1-3 cups of beans depending on how big you want to make the meal AND probably .5 cups of some kind of nut thrown into the mix.

 

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Get stronger and Improve Your Cardio with Cardio Strength Training.

Get stronger and Improve Your Cardio with Cardio Strength Training.

At KDR, we like to use something called cardio strength training. It’s a blend of strength training movements such as squats, deadlifts, bench presses, etc. done in a circuit fashion with minimal to moderate rest between movements. We have found that this is THE BEST WAY to get our members strong AND improve their cardiovascular health…in the least amount of time.

If you are crunched for time but still want to torch fat, build muscle and improve your overall health – this is exactly how you have to be working out.

Give me a little bit more details, please?

Ok, you got it. Generally speaking, training is broken up into two parts:
– Strength – this is usually your free weight or machine based training.
– Conditioning – this would usually be your cardio machine, running, etc. based training.

The goal of strength training is to improve strength and build muscle while the purpose of conditioning is to improve your cardiovascular fitness. They are thought to be exclusive, i.e. you can’t do both at the same time. However, what we have found is that you can combine both to reap benefits of each. By taking large full body movements performed for 5-20 reps or 15-45 seconds with minimal rest in between exercises, you can stoke the metabolic furnace and reap the benefits of both strength training and conditioning. Think HIIT (high-intensity interval training), with weights.

Why is this form of training superior to keeping my conditioning and strength training sessions separate?

Listen, not all of us have 6 hours to spend in the gym working on chest one day, biceps another day, back on a third day, etc. And then STILL have to get in some cardiovascular training for our heart. Looking good is great, but if you can’t walk up a flight of stairs without getting out of breath, then what good is looking good!

By doing cardio strength training, you can get all of the work you need…in only two sessions 60 minutes sessions per week! By taking two days and hitting your entire body with compound full body movements you can drastically reduce the time in the gym as well as significantly improve your results.

 

 

Show me the data!

Ok, first of all, the research is ALWAYS behind the times when it comes to training people. That’s just the nature of the beast. I can go out into our gym and conduct any number of tests that will never see the pages of a peer-reviewed journal. However, it’s always nice to be validated in what you’re doing!

In one study conducted at East Tennessee University conducted in 2001 looked at two groups of obese women. One group did steady state aerobic training for eight weeks three times per week. The other did perform HIIT 3 times per week for the same eight weeks. Both groups worked until they burned 300 calories during their workouts.

Conclusion – ONLY the interval group improved their body composition, and ONLY the interval group improved their resting metabolic rate (a number of calories you burn at rest, the more you burn, the better!). To reiterate – the two groups worked out three days per week for eight weeks and until they hit 300 calories, with the difference being the intensity of the workout.

In another study, Dr. Martin Gibala from McMaster University in Canada looked at a steady state group and a HIIT group. The hit group did four to six 30 second all out sprints on a cycle with a 4-minute rest interval (total work out time each session was under 20 minutes), while the steady state group did 90-120 minutes of continuous moderate cycling.

Conclusion – The researcher found NO DIFFERENCE between the two groups in terms of benefits. So, I have to work out hard for about 20 minutes, and that gives me the same benefits of working out moderate for 3-4 TIMES the amount of time? Sign me up for the 20 minutes, please!

What about the argument for calories burned? Well, here’s a study that was published in 1994 by Tremblay et al. They took two groups, one completed 20 weeks of steady state endurance and the other completed 15 weeks of HIIT. When all was said and done – the SS group burned 28,661 calories vs. only 13,614 in the HIIT group.

Conclusion – The HIIT group burned 900 percent more subcutaneous fat then the SS group…with five weeks LESS commitment and by burning over 14,000 calories LESS!

 

Sold yet?! GREAT! Here’s a sample work out:

 

This is a density based work out – your goal is to do more work in the same amount of time, that’s density training.

Day 1

DB Front Squat = 10 reps
rest 20 seconds
Push Up to Row = 10 push ups and 10 rows alternating hands
rest 20 seconds
Jump Deadlifts = 10 reps
rest 20 seconds
Chops = 8 each side
rest 20 seconds
Front Plank = 30 seconds
Rest 90 seconds

Repeat as many times as possible in 20 minutes.

Day 2

RDL’s = 15 reps
rest 20 seconds
High Pulls = 15 reps
rest 20 seconds
DL to curls = 15 reps
rest 20 seconds
Standing Tomahawks = 15 reps
rest 20 seconds
Side plank rotations = 30 seconds
rest 90 seconds
Repeat as many times as possible in 20 minutes.
Notes!
Keep track of your rounds, your goal is to do more rounds in the same amount of time.
You should be breathing hard at the end of each exercise.
Do this work out for 6 weeks, one day on, one day off.
Increase your weight every other week.
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Buttfessions A Kettlebell Fitness Coach: Jamie’s Story

Buttfessions A Kettlebell Fitness Coach: Jamie’s Story

Here’s my buttfession as a Kettlebell Fitness Coach. I have a bubble butt; most girls dream off. I don’t have a genetically gifted booty (maybe I can convince my sister and mom for a butt shot so you can see the difference), I wasn’t born with this butt. I worked hard for my butt. Luckily my fiancé is a butt man, he helped me sculpt my glutes into what they are today, it took time, but I think he’s happy with how they turned out.

Don’t get me wrong I love my butt, because it’s mine but finding pants is challenging. You know when you find that pair that fits your butt and quads BUT it loose around the waist and flares out…annoying. As annoying as it is, I wouldn’t change it. After having gained 80lbs and losing 60lbs…things just don’t fall into place, unfortunately.

Here are my top 5 butt exercises as a Kettlebell Fitness Coach that will not only strengthen your glutes (there are so many benefits to having a strong butt) but will change the shape of your glutes as well, these are our “butt builders.” We classify glute exercises into builders and sculptures. Builders help add muscle size; sculptures help sculpt the muscle you already have. In a future article, I’ll write about my favorite booty sculptures.

1. Hip Ups – there are tons of variations such as Single Leg, Shoulder Elevated, Feet Elevated(also known as Hip Bridges) For more advanced lifters I would have you do Barbell Hip Ups.

2. KB Swings


3. Squats – YES you need to squat!


4. Rear foot elevated Split Squat(also know as Bulgarian Split Squat) – I love it and hate it!


5. Deadlifts


Oh and make sure you squeeze your butt! “If you don’t squeeze it no one else will,” (Ben’s signature butt joke…I have been listening to for ten years). By squeezing your butt, you’re making sure that you engage all of your glute muscles (there are three of them) in addition to increasing the “tone” of the butt. You know what I mean…it’s great to have a bubble butt, but it’s better to have a TIGHT bubble butt. That’s tone! Tight = tone.

I taught a class once and cued the class to squeeze their butts and this guy would squeeze his butt with his hands on every rep…that was awkward, to say the least.

Squeeze your butt ALL the time, walking, sitting, stretching…just fucking squeeze it.

On the next buttfessions, let’s talk about how to find pants and my favorite butt sculpting movements.

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